Should You Run Every Day?

Should You Run Every Day?

Is there any benefit to running every day? Let’s find out

 

 

 

You love running, and you have time to do a short run every day. But before you head out for today’s run, let’s look at the pros and cons to such high-frequency running.

How Long Have You Been Running?

Maintaining an everyday running streak will suit some personalities and physiologies better than others. A key consideration is how long you’ve been running for. Daily running is not a good idea for beginners. You need to build up and have a solid background behind you, or you risk injury. Set a solid base first before you think about running every day. 3-5 times a week for 6 months is the minimum requirement.

Should Every Day Be The Same?

Definitely not. At least two of your weekly runs need to be short and easy – think a slow, steady mile or two. This is especially important when you first set out on a daily running streak. This kind of active recovery is relevant even when you are training for a long race goal.

How To Structure Your Weekly Training

There are no rules to setting out a daily-running training plan. But just like any programme, you should include some short recovery runs. For these, choose a short loop which you know is safe, well lit and easy underfoot in all weathers. Make it easy for yourself to automate your daily running.

Does Each Run Need A Purpose?

People who run every day tend to have a different philosophy to those who run 2-4 times a week. They see their daily runs as activity and movement, rather than training. So not every run needs to have a purpose. You might start to treat your shortest runs as active recovery, me-time, or a way to shake off the stress of the day.

Is Running Every Day Good For You?

The human body is great at adapting to demands. So a daily running streak can be beneficial to your cardiovascular health, fitness, and weight management. Not to mention your mental health and happiness! Just be sensible: look out for aches and pains, niggling injuries, or tiredness. If it stops being fun, don’t be too proud to break your running streak. Don’t keep your daily plan going if it’s making you ill, tired, or taking away from family or social time.

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